Wildlife Photography with Clinton Ferarra

It’s a truth universally known (or at least deduced from Instagram) that a person in possession of any device capable of taking a photo is in for a real delight in Hood Canal. From the rugged Olympic Mountaintops to the giant octopus-inhabited depths of the fjord, there’s hardly a cranny that’s not delightfully picturesque. However, almost always, an iPhone falls painfully short.

We caught up with one of the photographers whose expert and artful photos of Hood Canal have enticed us, left us breathless, inspired new journeys, and fortified our belief in the mighty DSLR. Read on to get the first-hand perspective of Clinton Ferarra. Note: all photos featured in this post were captured by him.

A bald eagle swooping for the kill

A bald eagle swooping for the kill

 

Meet Clinton Ferarra

If you’ve come across a jaw-dropping photo of a bird in Hood Canal—one that doesn’t just capture detail, but also embodies personality and movement—chances are it’s one of Clinton Ferarra’s masterpieces.

Though his photos are masterful, his mission is humble. When asked what he wants to say with his photos, Ferarra says, “Come and see this place and these animals. They are accessible to everyone.”

Gold Finch in Hood Canal

Gold Finch in Hood Canal

 

You shoot a variety of wildlife photography around Hood Canal. What camera gear do you use?

I have used a variety of Nikon DSLR cameras and lenses. Currently I favor a Nikon D610 full frame camera, and my everyday lens is a Nikkor 28-300mm. When shooting landscapes, I grab my Nikkor 18-35mm and keep my Nikkor 60mm macro on hand for flowers. When it comes to long-range wildlife, I use my Sigma 150-500mm.

Rofous Hummingbird

Rofous Hummingbird

 

Which photographers influence your work?

Ansel Adams and Eliot Porter. I learned a great deal about bird photography from Scott Bourne on his Photofocus podcasts. KelbyOne provided essential training in Photoshop and Lightroom post processing.

Where is your favorite place to shoot around Hood Canal?

That would depend entirely on the time of year. Late spring draws eagles and herons in Annas Bay. Summer is best at Staircase Campground in the rainforest. Fall brings the trumpeter swans to Purdy Creek, and I love to shoot them. Winter brings diving ducks to every corner of the canal and eagles to the Skokomish Valley along with elk. It would be impossible to choose an all-time favorite.

Heron swooping in for landing

Heron swooping in for landing


Do you know someone who delights in shooting the under-trodden nooks of Hood Canal? Someone who sleeps with a tripod and welcomes the sunrise DSLR-in-hand? Is this person you? We’re on the hunt for those who love to shoot the Hood Canal. Get in touch with us, and you might be featured as next month’s Spotlight Photographer.

Until then, keep an eye out for photographic inspiration on FacebookTwitterInstagram, and Pinterest, and be sure to tag your creations with #wildsideWA so we can keep tabs on your travels about the Olympic Peninsula.